Magickal Connections

Tarot & Witchcraft ~ with author, Amythyst Raine

The Witch’s Diary

7 Comments

Video Blog…The Witch’s Diary: Hair, Hair, Hair

click Here

 

Advertisements

Author: Amythyst Raine

Witchy, Pagan, Personal Stuff Amythyst Raine is an author; a professional tarot reader; the mother to 7 magickal individuals; a major procrastinator; Crazy-Cat-Lady; and chocoholic. She writes books on witchcraft, the tarot, and Feminine Spirituality (published by Labyrinth House, Moon Books, and Dodona Books). She's an avid blogger; a pagan activist; a holistic healer through crystals and stones-- by means of crystal grids and chakra balancing. Amythyst offers Spiritual Psychic Consultations using tarot cards and the art of intuitive reading. If you'd like a personal reading with her, visit her tarot website at: http://tarotreadingswithamythystraine.blogspot.com "Every Cat Has a Tale" is her Personal-Blog-Spot, which includes everyday life and its dilemmas, as well as victories, memoirs, opinions, along with inspiration for mundane life, with personal photos and videos. http://everycathasatale.blogspot.com "Magickal Connections" is her witchy, pagan, booky BlogSpot. http://wytchymystique.com "The Witch's Corner" is her very popular witchy pagan website full of witchy pagan stuff. http://amythystraine.blogspot.com

7 thoughts on “The Witch’s Diary

  1. Since it is easier for me to leave a comment here on your WordPress site, here goes!

    I think your hair is utterly fabulous! From what I can tell, you have lots of hair (i.e. the number of hairs on your scalp and how close together they are) but the hair itself looks thinner and even a bit fragile – so I bet gentleness is essential!

    I just recently purchased some Argan Oil and only use a drop on my hair after wetting (or washing), and my scalp has become SO sensitive that I use no chemicals at all anymore. I am freshening between by spritzing some local lavender hydrosol, which worked fine for summer but it is a bit drying now that it is colder/dryer so I am figuring out what to do with that now.

    For color: While my hair is super-thin and wavier than I remember (haha), I am fortunate to be a brunette and not graying too quickly, and that my Irish skin tone and hazel eye color allows warmer tones in my hair. I make oily, super-strong fresh-ground organic coffee and mix it very warm with pure red henna powder, allowing it to sit covered in a ceramic bowl on stove top with oven on (or in sun in summer) and apply once every 4-6 weeks all over my hair (and usually have some left over to put in a ziplock baggie in fridge to touch up roots in between, especially my part and around my face). I added olive or jojoba oil (only a few drops) and look forward to trying Argan oil this way next time! I also like to brew the coffee with freshly-ground cardamon (just grind 3-5 pods with the coffee beans) and right before applying use essential oils that I like to smell (it varies with my mood and season, and this time of year it is ginger and nutmeg with warm citrus). I like the color and texture of my hair better with strong coffee than when using lemon juice, orange juice or vinegar (and it smells better). I let the prepared set on my hair with a plastic cap and an aluminum-foil cap (you can even use a big plastic bag and actual aluminum foil in a pinch) for 3-5 hours doing stuff around the house, and rinse (not wash) thoroughly and not wash for at least 3 days.

    When time to wash – I am SO going to try the type of shampoo/conditioner you recommend in this video 🙂

    I had hormonal imbalance, which dramatically thinned my already-thin hair further, and it is more fragile with harsh Montana conditions added to that. I have been drinking herbal teas that help balance my hormones (which ended up alleviating the headaches, thank the deities!) and for growing thicker hair back (and to attempt to get length again, I miss it), I am brewing the night before a small amount of nettle(s) tea (rosemary optionally added) and applying to my scalp (either with a spray bottle or dabbing with cotton). For those who cannot use henna due to the warm red tones but wish to darken – try sage tea this way (yes, kitchen sage). It doesn’t last that long so don’t make too much at once. Spray it onto your hair daily all over until it is the shade desired, then maintain it once or twice a week with applying sage tea to roots and periodically all over – this works remarkably well if you are consistent!

    This year, I was getting my trims with the schedule here and it has proven well – he uses a different type of astrology:
    https://www.morroccomethod.com/lunar-hair-care and wondered if you used the moon cycles for hair care – THANKS tons for the video, and keep rocking that hair of yours – it is awesome!

    • Thanks, Lisa!…I was sitting here, rapt, following your hair care description– for some reason, it’s intriguing to hear what other women do. I love the idea of henna, and I’ve thought about doing this with my hair, so the next time I’m ready to do something, I may ask Daniel to roll up his sleeves for me.

      • Yeah I know it is a little different hehe! Do you color your hair now? I didn’t catch if you did on your video. If so, you may wish to see if the procedures in your case will mix together. Henna doesn’t like playing with chemicals much. From what friends tell me when they were transitioning, it seemed OK if they had colored it a month or more prior, and it works better for hair that was darkened. It is also a lifestyle commitment, meaning that from the first henna treatment onward, to not go back to chemical haircolor. As an example – If you lighten your hair with bleach or high volume peroxide, try henna once (or more) and then try to go back, that could be disaster. I have heard this doesn’t even do that well with darkening, since the actions of hair color and henna differ so much. It could be good to try it on some hair you have collected from a hairbrush (or comb in your case) and you might need to save quite a bit in order to get a true idea of what it would look like with henna (and it could be good to have two hair bundles so you can compare!).

        • Yes, I do color my hair now, but I’ve actually been considering letting it go ‘natural’– though my kids and hubby aren’t thrilled with this idea (go figure!)…we’ll see. You’ve got a good idea for ‘testing’ it out, though, much better to have negative results laying in a hairbrush, rather than being on my head!

          • Many people can rock gray hair really well, and I noticed it is a trend for many women right now to embrace this – and even hair colorists seek ways to color hair gray to “blend” in the growing out process, I have seen so many videos on YouTube for even young kids wanting “silver” hair, even if for a costume or something (and then dye it back). I guess I will cross that bridge when I get there, but I saw photos of my Irish father who had brown/dark hair even in his 60’s. I will consider darkening with sage tea AND using henna, or I might mix indigo with henna by then (a trickier process but could be worth it).

  2. Your hair looks so much like mine (I’m a mixed race woman) I wonder if there isn’t some rye bread hanging out with the white in your background 🙂 Your hair regime is similar to mine, which I had to come to after years of people having no clue what to do with my hair. Argan oil and jojoba is epic, and I swear by the Mixed Chicks products.

    For years my hair stopped growing – literally a decade when it didn’t grow at all, due to an undiagnosed auto-immune arthritis. I’ve finally got that sorted out, as well as added selenium, and my hair is growing like mad! I try to remember enough to take care of it, washing twice a week, and then putting a bit of coconut oil on my hair afterwards, which really makes the curls pop in my hair.

    I use henna as the person above highlights – it’s lovely stuff but I’m more interested in its conditioning properties (and it’s plenty of those). Personally I can’t wait to rawk my grey if it ever shows up, but I suspect it’s going to be a while before I see any.

    • You are extremely observant!…Actually, I’ve wondered this myself, and when I was in my early 20s, I asked my grandmother about our family’s heritage. All she could tell me for sure was that my Great-grandmother (on my mother’s side) was Native American, a full-blooded Chippewa woman; and that my Great-grandmother (on my father’s side) was half Lakota Sioux. This still doesn’t explain my hair– Native American hair is generally fine and straight. Two of my daughters have hair like mine; and I could tell that it was going to be this way even when they were new babies, just with baby fuzz on their little heads. It just had a ‘different’ feel about it when I ran my hand over their heads, more coarse, not fine and silky like the others.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s