Magickal Connections

Tarot & Witchcraft ~ with author, Amythyst Raine

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From The Witch’s Corner ~ Making Incense with Your Kitchen Spices

I am a WITCH on a BUDGET! I’m always thinking of ways to Use What I Have around the house and incorporate it into my magickal practice.  One of my favorite things to work with is incense.  There’s just something about scent that puts you in a perfect frame of mind for all kinds of magick.  It helps me to focus on my intention, and it keeps me centered and inspired with all kinds of good positive energy.  We can’t all afford expensive incense and fancy burners.  Did you know that you can make Loose Powdered Incense from the everyday ingredients in your kitchen cupboard?  Well, you can; and this video will show you how to do it, and how well it works…the only thing we’re lacking is a “scratch n’ sniff”!  Enjoy the video, and have fun making your own incense.  Blessings, Amythyst

The Witch’s Corner
Magickal Connections
The Tarot Parlour
Music ~
Avec Soin – Romance by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (



Herbs: The Magickal Acorn


The Acorn:

Good luck, protection, wisdom, and personal power.  A dried acorn is an excellent natural amulet for keeping a youthful appearance.

Technically, I’m not sure if the acorn counts as an “herb”, since it springs from the mighty Oak Tree…however, I do know that it most definitely is full of magickal energy, and it is part of the sacred world of plants, so we’ll include it here.  Just so you know, I have an entire glass container full of acorns for my own magickal use. 🙂

The lore:

The oak is a sacred tree to many cultures and spiritual practitioners, including the Druids. There is a Nordic tale of the great god Thor sheltering beneath a mighty oak tree during a storm.  The goddess Diana is often depicted wearing a necklace of acorns.  The Celts and Druids found the oak tree especially symbolic of the Samhain season.  The tree is a symbol of the Horned God, Herne (or Cernunnos)

The acorn is considered the first sacred food of civilization.  It’s symbolic of security and abundance, and it counteracts loneliness, illnesses, and pain.  It’s energy aids in maintaining longevity, draws good luck, and preserves the illusion of youth.

You can identify your true love by labeling two acorn caps with your name and the name of your beloved.  Float them in a bowl of water, if they drift together, you’ve made a successful match, if they float apart…so does your love.

Or as Dr. Jung suggested, an Oak tree becomes an Oak tree, not a radish.  So it is with human beings.

For more magickal information on herbs,
follow this link:

 Magickal Herbs



Find the Magick: Macaroni & Cheese

Here’s the recipe, which sounds delicious!  We’re going to go through the ingredients and see just what kind of magick can be found in this simple popular dish:

Food 2

Makes 4 servings

8 ounces uncooked elbow macaroni
2 cups shredded sharp Cheddar cheese
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
3 cups milk
1/4 cup butter
2 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup bread crumbs
1 pinch paprika


1.  Cook macaroni according to the package directions. Drain.
2.  In a saucepan, melt butter or margarine over medium heat. Stir in enough flour to make a roux. Add milk to roux slowly, stirring constantly. Stir in cheeses, and cook over low heat until cheese is melted and the sauce is a little thick. Put macaroni in large casserole dish, and pour sauce over macaroni. Stir well.
3.  Melt butter or margarine in a skillet over medium heat. Add breadcrumbs and brown. Spread over the macaroni and cheese to cover. Sprinkle with a little paprika.
4.  Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 30 minutes. Serve.

The Magick:

Paprika…Use to add energy to any spell or mixture.  Throw in someone’s yard to cause them problems.
Also Called: African Pepper, Bird Pepper, Chili Pepper, Goat’s Pod, Grains of Paradise, Red Pepper, Sweet Pepper, Tabasco Pepper, Zanzibar Pepper, Capsicu

Wheat (found in the bread crumbs & the macaroni)…Induces fertility and conception, attracts money

Salt (if you add a dash)…Cleansing, purification, exorcism

The Divine Connection:

Wheat is a grain associated with the goddess Demeter:

“DEMETER was the great Olympian goddess of agriculture, grain, and bread, the prime sustenance of mankind. She also presided over the foremost of the Mystery Cults which promised its initiates the path to a blessed afterlife. Demeter was depicted as a mature woman, often crowned and holding sheaves of wheat and a torch…”  For more info– lots more, click Here

T78 INT 37

 Mother & Daughter
(Demeter and Persephone)


Find the Magick: in a cup of tea

coffee time 3

In the spirit of Kitchen Wytchery, let’s find the magick in a cup of tea, and I’m not talking about a special cup of tea that we’re brewing just for some magickal mysterious purpose, but a ready-made tea purchased at the local grocery store.  *These teas are chockfull of herbs which all contain magickal occult properties, something the average person is totally unaware of.  We’re going through the ingredients to find out just what kind of energies we’re working with:

The tea:  “Dream Easy”

The brand:  “Hyvee” (a local grocery store chain here in the mid-west, this is their store brand)

The ingredients:  chamomile, spearmint, lemon grass, tilia flowers, blackberry leaves, orange blossoms, hawthorn berries, rosebuds

The Magick:

1.  Chamomile:  energy/projective (masculine); planet/Sun; element/Water.  First, I beg to differ with the source I’m using for this info, but I find the fact that this herb’s energy is masculine (projective) and it’s planetary association (the Sun) is  also masculine, yet it’s linked to the feminine element of Water– I get it “sleepy time, relaxing, etc.”; and, Water, as in dreams. But this still doesn’t feel right to me– the sun, the energy, all points to the element of Fire.  Just saying.

Magickal energies:  for sleep, to promote calmness, but also for luck in money matters; used in issues dealing with god energy– men’s mysteries, men’s health, etc., healing energies in general.

2.  Spearmint:  energy/receptive (feminine); planet/Venus; element/Water. 

Magickal energies:  used to promote healing, especially of the lungs (respiratory issues); used to promote love– actually to generate a little lust it’s said, though this herb would not be my first choice in this matter, way too tame to ignite this kind of raw passion, if you ask me, spearmint would lend itself better to something quieter and more deliberate, like sultry seduction; used to sharpen your mental faculties, though the element used for this endeavor would best be left to Air.  It’s also said that this is the herb you want to tuck into your pillow, or keep near your bed, as it will protect you at your most vulnerable– when you’re asleep.

3.  Lemon grass:  energy/projective (masculine); planet/Mercury; element/Air.

Magickal energies:  This herb is used to repel snakes– though, unless they were poisonous or dangerous, I don’t know why anyone would deliberately want to repel snakes, unless they had some deep seated phobia.  Snakes are beneficial to your garden, and reflective of wisdom and goddess energy.  Lemon grass is also used to heighten your psychic awareness, and again, this is another herb used to enhance lust.

4.  Tilia flowers:  (also known as “linden flowers” or “lime flowers”) energy/receptive (feminine); planet/Venus; element/Water.

Magickal energies:  the energies are geared to love, luck, sleep, rest, dreams, weddings, and beauty.  What’s not to love about tilia flowers.  The energy of the Linden trees are said to be protective, this is also a ‘tree of immortality’, which would lend it’s energy perfectly for magickal spells of eternal youth and beauty; this is a favorite herb for all kinds of love magicks.  Make a dream pillow of equal parts lavender and tilia which promotes both restful sleep and prophetic dreams.

5.  Blackberry leaves:  energy/receptive (feminine); planet/Venus; element/Water.  This herb is sacred to the old Celtic goddess Brighid, renowned for healing, poetry, and smithcraft.  She’s most notably celebrated on February 2nd, a holiday called Imbolc.

Magickal energies:  healing, money, and protection.

6.  Orange Blossoms:  energy/projective (masculine); planet/Sun; element/Fire.

Magickal energies:  love (known as “Love Fruit”), divination, luck, and money.  The dried peel and seeds are used in a wide array of love magick, whether it be candle magick, mojo bags, or dollies, and this magick is serious– whompom serious– this is magick geared to culminate with a walk down the aisle. (I think it’s a hoot that orange blossoms are tremendously popular in wedding bouquets, but the general public doesn’t have a clue as to why.) Enhance your beauty by adding orange seeds to your bath water, or by drinking orange juice with this intention.  This adds a new dimension to the old saying “beautiful inside and out”, no kidding, there are many forms of beauty, and what you are inside is going to show on the outside. (There’s a few specific people I’d like to point this out to but, ahem, we’ll move on.)  Orange blossoms are added to love and lust potions, and since the element here is Fire, use with discretion, I imagine these potions carry quite a punch.  The divination aspect, specifically for yes/no questions– ask a question, eat an orange, count the seeds– even/yes; odd/no.

7.  Hawthorn berries:  energy/projective (masculine); planet/ Mars; element/Fire.

Magickal energies:  fertility, chastity, fishing luck, happiness.  Because of it’s ability to increase fertility, this herb was long used in wedding ceremonies; on the other side of this coin, and it’s quite a flip– the leaves of the Hawthorn tree are said to promote chastity.  I would imagine that these leaves, along with nutmeg, could be used in some high-falutin fidelity magick, but this would best be done with extreme caution, or there might be a whole lot of people who are going to find themselves suddenly celibate when this is not the desired outcome.  Carry these berries with you on fishing ventures to fill your nets (and your skillet); use these berries to help alleviate depression (magically speaking, mind you); and turn to the Hawthorn for protection from lightening and evil spirits.

The Hawthorn tree does have some weight in the world of the witch– they use to be used to decorate Maypoles for Beltaine, and as far as lore goes, it was believed that Hawthorn trees were actually witches who transformed themselves into the tree (to avoid being burned at the stake, no doubt).  Hawthorn trees are sacred to the witch.

8.  Rosebuds:  energy/receptive (feminine); planet/Venus; element/Water.

Magickal energies:  love (and divination for love), psychic powers, healing, protection.

Are you kidding, this is The Ultimate Herb used for all kinds of love magicks, bar none.  It is the epitome of love magick, encompassing human coupling on every level imaginable, and many levels you haven’t imagined yet.  It’s worn for this purpose, given as a gift for this purpose, used in candle magick, mojo bags, hoodoo dollies, and in any significant way that a practitioner can come up with; it’s been burned, buried, and frozen, all in the name of love.  A tea made of rosebuds is drank at bedtime to promote healthy sleep and prophetic dreams– and what do you think the main topic of these dreams will be– you got it.  Rosebuds and rosehips are used in spells to attract fairies to your garden, to heal minor aches and pains, as well as to relieve stress.

Now, drink your tea…

coffee time 4

*Note:  This statement is not meant to alarm anyone who doesn’t practice witchcraft.  By using these teas, you are not inadvertently casting magick spells hither and thither.  Remember– everything used and done to cast a spell must be used and done with intention.  It’s all in the mind; it’s all in your purpose.

The sources for this article:  “Encyclopedia of Magickal Herbs” by Scott Cunningham, and my own Book of Shadows


*Note: the photo is courtesy of Pinterest


Gingerbread: A Magickal Recipe for Yule

As the Kitchen Witch knows, natural magick can be found in certain foods and recipes with the use of herbs.  Your most mundane everyday recipe can be chock full of magick.  Most people would be surprised at how pertinent the use of certain spices and herbs are, particularly in holiday recipes centered around festivals and celebration.  Following is a recipe for gingerbread, an old time favorite for this winter season; and following the recipe is a list of the ingredients used that contain the spark of magick.

m_BAshwood6-1.jpg picture by witch_of_endore


2 1/2 cups flour 1 cup molasses

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 cup shortening

1 egg 1 1/2 tsp. baking soda

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 teaspoon ginger

3/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 tsp. ground cloves

1 cup boiling water

In a large bowl, measure all the ingredients.  With a mixer at low speed, beat until well mixed, constantly scraping the bowl with a rubber spatula.  Beat at medium speed 3 minutes.  Pour the batter into a pan and bake 55-60 minutes at 350 degrees


We’ll look at some of the ingredients now from a magickal perspective:

Cinnamon:  Spirituality, success, healing, power, psychic powers, lust, protection, love

Ginger: Love, money, success, power

Salt: Purification, protection, grounding, money

Cloves: Protection, exorcism, love, money

Sugar: Love, lust


Some “Berry” Nice Magick :)

Mundanely speaking, there isn’t a berry I don’t find delicious, so I’ve included a recipe for each berry in this post.  Magickally speaking, there’s much more to these colorful delectable morsels than a muggle would ever guess, so we’re going to take a good look at this side of berries:


Folk Names: Bilberry

Power: Protection

Deities:  Dark Lord; Lugh; the Hunter

Magical Uses:

Place some blueberries beneath the doormat to keep undesirables away from your property, or from entering your home. This protects against evil as well.

Make blueberry pies or tarts and eat when under psychic attack; this gets the protection inside you and increases the herb’s effectiveness.

To “bother” an enemy:  soak dried blueberry leaves in hot water overnight.  Stir in black mustard seed the following morning and throw this concoction across your enemy’s path, where they will step in it.

Blueberry Pie

2/3 to 3/4 cups sugar
¼ all-purpose flour
½ teaspoon grated lemon peel
¼ teaspoon nutmeg
5 cups blueberries
Pastry for one 2-crust pie/9”
1 tablespoon butter or margarine

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. In large bowl, combine the first 6 ingredients; let stand.

Roll out half of the pastry and line a 9 inch pie plate. Spoon filling evenly into crust; dot with butter or margarine. Prepare top crust and cover pie, sealing the edges. Bake 50 minutes or until golden.



Folk Names: European Raspberry, Red Raspberry

Gender: Feminine

Planet: Venus

Element: Water

Powers: Protection, love

Magical Uses:

The brambles (branches) of the raspberry are hung up at doors and windows for protection. This is also done when a death has occurred, so that the spirit won’t re-enter the house once it has left.

Raspberry is served as a love-inducing food, and the leaves are carried by pregnant women to alleviate the pains of pregnancy and childbirth.

Hoodoo mojo, “To Hold a Man”:  There are a few ways that this plant can be used to bind a man to you– and you’d better make darn sure you want him before you do this, because once it’s done, you can’t change your mind…1)  Make a tincture with raspberry leaves in a quart jar filled with spring water.  Pour this tincture over your body while repeatedly reciting the man’s name. 2)  It’s said that a man will never want to wander far from his woman or stray from the marital bed if she washes her genitals in raspberry leaf tea, sprinkles periwinkle on his food, and hides a magnolia leaf in the mattress…good luck, Ladies.

Turn about is fair play.

Now it’s the guys’ turn– more hoodoo mojo, “To Hold a Woman”:  You have to find a branch of raspberry that has rooted at the tip, and take some of this from the plant without killing the plant.  Boil the root in spring water, bathe in it, drink some of it; then serve the rest of it to your wife.  It will keep the little woman faithful– if it doesn’t make her sick.**

*see the note below

Raspberry Lime Lemonade

1 1/2 cups lemon juice
1/3 cup lime juice
1 cup sugar
6 cups water
1 cup fresh raspberries

Combine lemon juice, lime juice, sugar, and water in a 2 quart pitcher.  Stir until the sugar is completely dissolved.  Add the raspberries and chill overnight.  Pour over ice, serving it with a lemon or lime slice.



Folk Names: Poziomki, Tchilek, Jordboer

Gender: Feminine

Planet: Venus

Element: Water

Deity: Freya

Powers: Love, Luck

Magical Uses:

Strawberries are served as a love food, and the leaves are carried for luck. Pregnant women may wish to carry a small packet of strawberry leaves to ease their pregnancy pains.  This berry can also be used to draw a stray lover back to you, but this spell I can’t post here– it’s a spell that’s included in my book, The Gray Witch’s Grimoire, which will be out in May.  All I can say is, it’s a doozy.

Strawberry Love Salad

2 (3 oz.) boxes strawberry jello
1 cup boiling water
2 (10 oz.) boxes frozen strawberries, thawed
1 can crushed pineapple
1 package Dream Whip


1 package cream cheese
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup chopped nuts

Dissolve jello into water. Add the pineapple and strawberries (with the juice). Refrigerate. Make the topping, which includes whipping together the Dream Whip, cream cheese, and sugar. Garnish with nuts.



Folk Names: Bly, Bramble, Bramble-Kite, Cloudberry, Dewberry, Goutberry,High blackberry, Thimbleberry

Gender: Feminine

Planet: Venus

Element: Water

Deity: Brigit

Powers: Healing, Money, Protection

Ritual Uses:

Blackberry was considered to be sacred to some of the old Pagan deities of Europe, and was used in worship. To the present day, blackberry pies are baked on Lughnasadh (August 2) by some of the Wiccans in commemoration of the harvest, seen poetically as the death of the God.

Magickal Uses:

The blackberry leaves are used in spells of wealth, as are the berries themselves, and the vines are protective if grown.

The blackberry plant is also used to heal scalds by dipping nine blackberry leaves in spring water and then laying them against the wound gently, while saying the following chant three times to each leaf (27 times in all):

“Three ladies came from the east,
One with fire and two with frost.
Out with fire, in with frost. “

This is an old invocation to Brigit, the ancient Celtic Goddess of poetry, healing, and smith craft.

Hang onto your hoodoo hats, “To Send Back Evil”:  You’ll need a black candle in the shape of a human figure, whether it’s male or female will depend upon your enemy, and most new-age shops carry these candles.  Lay this candle on a red cloth, sprinkle it with blackberry leaves and black salt.  Wrap it up and tie both ends shut with a black ribbon.  Hit this bundle three times with a hammer while shouting out the name of your enemy and exactly what evil-ass energy you want to return to them.  Do this for seven days, repeating the exact words each time.  On the eighth day, take this bundle to the graveyard, bury it and ask the spirits of the dead to dole out justice…Now this hoodoo magick, I can handle. *imagine evil wicked cackle inserted at this point*

Blackberry Pudding

1 1/4 cups milk
1/4 to 1/2 cup ground almonds
1 1/4 cups water
1 pint fresh blackberries
1/3 cup merlot or other red wine
2 tablespoons rice flour
1/3 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ginger
1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon butter @ room temp
2 tablespoons wine vinegar
1/4 cup fresh currants
whip cream…for garnish

Place the blackberries in a bowl, and pour the wine over them, mixing gently– gently!  The berries will soak up some of the wine; pour the rest off and discard (I can hear you groaning).  Using a blender, combine the berries, rice, flour, sugar, salt, spices, and milk until well blended.  Pour this mixture into a large saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly.  once it’s hit a rolling boil, lit boil for two minutes to thicken.  Remove from heat and stir in butter, then the vinegar, and then the currants. 

Pour this mixture into a large serving bowl, or small individual dessert dishes.  Chill and serve with a topping of whip cream.


The delicious recipes for this post, or some of them anyway, have come from the following sources. (If you think I hang around the kitchen creating new recipes, think again– and listen, you might be able to hear my husband laughing.)

“From a Witch’s Kitchen:  Celebrating Seasonal Magic in Every Meal”
by Beth Brown

“The Wicca Cookbook:  Recipes, Ritual, & Lore”
by Jamie Wood & Tara Seefeldt

Both of these are great books, filled with wonderful recipes galore and interesting information.  The Wicca Cookbook is actually filled with quite an impressive load of myth and folk-lore.  I highly recommend both books.

**Note:  I find a lot of this old hoodoo magick interesting and entertaining to read about, but realistically I would be very careful about actually using this type of magick on anyone; not only from an ethical viewpoint as far as magick and the rules of propriety are concerned, but also from the practical mundane aspect of safety.  Just because the berries on a plant are edible, that doesn’t mean the entire plant is safe to ingest.  Rhubarb is a good example of this– as delicious as the stem is, the leaves are poisonous.


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December Newsletter & Updates

16wsx.gif picture by witch_of_endore

I’ve included in this newsletter an excerpt from the book I’m working on now: 

“The Gray Witch’s Grimoire”


 You’ll find it in the section titled, ‘Spell of the Month’. 
It’s a handy little spell called:

“To Spite Your Face”


This newsletter is loaded with all sorts of information, links, and special offers from my website, The Witch’s Corner, as well as the usual sections for those interested in divination, crystal magic, kitchen wytchery, and herbs.

Click  Here  to enter this beautiful winter wonderland!